Backpack Full of Cash

Film Screening and Panel Discussion
December 6, 2017
Time: 
4:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Speaker: 
Panel: Jorge Ruiz de Velasco, Frank Adamson, and Chela Delgado
Location: 
CERAS 101
Cost: 
Free and open to the public
Contact: 
SCOPE@stanford.edu

What are the equity impacts of investment in education as a public good? Of privatization approaches? To advance the discussion of this important question, SCOPE presents this independently produced documentary.

From the film makers:

This feature-length documentary explores the growing privatization of public schools and the resulting impact on America’s most vulnerable children. Filmed in Philadelphia, New Orleans, Nashville and other cities, Backpack Full of Cash takes viewers through the 2013–14 school year.

Backpack Full of Cash is a cautionary tale about how, in cities like Philadelphia, privatization and funding cuts have had a devastating impact on public schools and the most vulnerable children who rely on them. The film also showcases a model for improving schools–a well-resourced public school system in Union City, New Jersey, where poor kids are getting a high quality education without charters or vouchers.

Backpack Full of Cash features genuine heroes like the principals, teachers, activists, parents and most importantly, students who are fighting for their education. Education writer David Kirp, former Assistant Secretary of Education Diane Ravitch, and Linda Darling Hammond, the President and CEO of the Learning Policy Institute; and Emeritus Professor, Stanford Graduate School of Education, are a few the national thought leaders who provide analysis in the film. BACKPACK builds a case for public education as a basic civil right.

The screening of this full film will be followed by a panel discussion.  Please join us for this interesting and important conversation.

Co-Sponsor: 
Stanford Graduate School of Education
Co-Sponsor: 
Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity
Co-Sponsor: 
John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities
Co-Sponsor: 
Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality
Co-Sponsor: 
Stanford Criminal Justice Center